A Little Southern Fantasy

Rebel Belle

by Rachel Hawkins

rebel belle

Age: Young Adult
Series: 1 of 3
Contains: minor amount of cursing, death, violence, implied sex
Bruce Wayne’s parents get killed and he goes to Tibet or whatever, and Superman is an alien, and Spiderman had that radioactive spider. Me? I kissed a janitor in the school bathroom.

Book-a-likes: Etiquitte and Espionage by Gail Carriger, The Ghost and the Goth by Stacey Kade, and a little bit of Buffy the Vampire Slayer with a smidge of the Netflix movie Candy Jar

Harper Price and David Stark have hated each other forever. Harper’s mother tells her David is the only kid she ever bit in daycare. Harper is class president, cheerleader, future debutante–the Southern queen bee. David is a hipster nerd who can’t dress, runs the newspaper, and loves running articles on how Harper is screwing up the school.

So of course when it turns out that Harper has just inherited a pack of supernatural abilities, David is the one person in all the world she is meant to protect.

Let the wackiness ensue.

This is another book I did on audio, and I would definitely recommend it. The accents enhance the immersion into the world, especially (I would imagine) if you’re not from the South.

Speaking of the South, I can’t tell you how glad I am that not once did Hawkins allow anyone to come of as a dumb hick, just because of where in the country they were born. That crap bugs me so much.

eye-roll

Harper is great. She reminds me a lot of Alona Dare in The Ghost and the Goth. Smart, funny, on top of her game–she’s on top of the high school pyramid, but that doesn’t automatically make her a jerk either.

I had the chance to meet Rachel Hawkins at the last book festival I attended, but lines were long and while I had Hex Hall in my possession, I hadn’t actually read it yet so I skipped it. Now I wish I’d gotten her to sign because I loved this book so much! The writing is fresh and funny.
I picked up the nearest weapon I could lay my hands on: a stapler. I lifted it, going for “menacing.” I admit it lacked a certain elegance, but hey. It was worth a shot. David placed his hand on my arm and pushed it back down.
“What?”
“Just . . . that’s embarrassing for all of us,” he replied.

The story also has that nice quality of hiding where it’s going, even though it’s leading you right to the answers the whole time. When you read as much as I do it’s nice not to guess all the plot points before they happen.

This was a fun read, and I’ve already started on number 2. Though I will admit I’m mildly stressed reading the second one because you know book 2 in a trilogy usually doesn’t end happy. But the beginning is actually feeling like a very specific Buffy episode… I’ll let you know more when I finish.

Until then, mind your manners, bake a cake for someone you owe an apology to, and say hello to your momma for me!

–Bronto Incognito

bronto 10a

Here are some similar books we’ve read that you might enjoy!

ghost

ettiquette

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